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Archive for the ‘United Methodist’ Category

As I write this on June 8, I’m witnessing the Senate Intelligence Committee questioning James Comey, and thinking about the importance of leadership without intimidation or coercion, with mutual trust and respect for differences. Presidents can abuse their authority, and so can pastors. We can abuse our position: rank or title, our resumé, our uniquely defined roles. We can abuse our personal characteristics: size, gender and personality traits. We can use these positional or personal realities to get our way even when it’s wrong, illegal, evil. And we can do damage.

Even in the United States, with its government of the people, by the people, and for the people, presidents can seek to become autocrats. Even in the Church, which exists for God’s glory and the development of disciples of Jesus Christ, pastors and laity can abuse the authority God and church give them.

Jesus said to them, “The rulers of the nations lord it over them; and those in authority over them are called ‘benefactors.’ But not so with you; rather the greatest among you must become like the youngest, and the leader like one who serves. … I am among you as one who serves.”   — (Luke 22:25-27 NRSV, alt.)

I, and most pastors and laity I know, desire to lead like Jesus, without domination or manipulation. But now and then, in our denomination and in our congregations, we “throw our weight around.” (Isn’t it interesting that this common saying portrays aggressive use of physical size as a metaphor for inappropriate coercion using positional authority!) Now and then we seek to get our own way using force or emotional manipulation: we threaten; we use anger, we take offense, we withdraw, we use financial pressure, and more. Instead, we should work together as partners who seek to understand and collaborate, appreciate, and come to a shared way that’s better than our own.

St. Francis of Assisi is credited with this prayer:

Lord, make us instruments of your peace.
Where there is hatred, let us sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is discord, union;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy. 

Grant that we may not so much seek
to be consoled as to console;
to be understood as to understand;
to be loved as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive;
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.
           — source: Book of Common Prayer

May this be our prayer as we work with each other, especially if we are called to lead, in church and in nation.

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I’m thankful to the recent video from the Wesleyan Covenant Association for reminding me that when I entered ordained ministry I gave my assent to the United Methodist doctrinal standards and General Rules (Par. 104, 2016 Book of Discipline), and that “promises should be kept.”

I have not kept those promises. To begin with some of the most important, I have broken the promises I made the year of my ordination, when my bishop asked, “Do you know the General Rules of our Church?” and “Will you keep the General Rules of our Church?” (Par. 336, 2016 Book of Discipline) I answered Yes to both. Since that time,  I have violated many of the General Rules. I invite the Wesleyan Covenant Association to bring formal complaints against me for the following:

a) The profaning the day of the Lord, either by doing ordinary work therein or by buying or selling. (On Sunday, February 26, 2016, I purchased ferry fare from Winslow to Seattle, and two hours’ parking in the parking lot at First United Methodist Church of Seattle. And I would offer my credit and debit card records to the prosecution, for evidence of earlier offenses.)

b) Drunkenness: buying or selling spirituous liquors, or drinking them, unless in cases of extreme necessity. (While I have not been drunk within the statute of limitations, I have at one time or another consumed spirituous liquor — not to mention beer & wine — and it has never been in the case of extreme necessity.)

c) Fighting, quarreling, brawling, brother going to law with brother; returning evil for evil, or railing for railing; the using many words in buying or selling. (On this item, I must plead guilty to the last point, the use of many words in buying. Specifically, I have purchased an automobile. I have purchased software. I have purchased home appliances. Did you ever read all the fine print? MANY words!)

d) The giving or taking things on usury— i.e., unlawful interest. (On this item, I expect that the Wesleyan Covenant Association would insist that the timeless biblical meaning of “usury” be the standard for what is “unlawful interest,” rather than bend the Bible to the whim of secular law that changes from year to year. My specific offense was buying that same car, taking out a loan from my credit union, at interest.)

e) Uncharitable or unprofitable conversation. (Facebook. Need I say more? And Twitter.)

f) Doing to others as we would not they should do unto us. (Too many times to count … but I did not stop to give change to a roadside beggar yesterday, though if I had been begging by the roadside, I’d have wanted someone to stop for me.)

g) Doing what we know is not for the glory of God, as:

 (1.) The putting on of gold and costly apparel. (I have a gold ring on my left hand. The coat I wore today cost about as much as my first paycheck. I could go on.)
(2.) The taking such diversions as cannot be used in the name of the Lord Jesus. (I watched NCIS the other day. Part of the Late Show last night.)
(3.) The singing those songs, or reading those books, which do not tend to the knowledge or love of God. (Song: Maxwell’s Silver Hammer. Book: The Great Gatsby.)
(4) Softness and needless self-indulgence. (You name it. Turning the heat up to 68. The seat-cushion in my car. The second and third cups of coffee in the morning. The vacations over the years to PEI, Thailand, Europe, the ocean … .)
(5) Laying up treasure upon earth. (Savings, pension plan, even Social Security, if you think about it.)

I’ll get to my violations of parts 2 and 3 of the General Rules some other time. I expect the Wesleyan Covenant Association will not wait for these before they designate serious-minded, promise-keeping, evangelical, orthodox members to hold me – and the rest of the people of The United Methodist Church – to account.

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